INSPIRED SERIES – Vesna Radonich

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World Master Games 2017 Medal Haul

VESNA RADONICH

First name: Vesna Aroha

Surname: Radonich Aka Taravana (Tahitian for crazy)

Is an opens & masters division Paddler from Auckland, lives in Gisborne and has been paddling for 10 years.  She typically participates in sprints and marathon events each year.  And loves coaching juniors.

ROUTINE

Day before race, I think about the kids meals, what we are having for dinner, is the family sorted. Then I focus on me, as I have learnt that for me to be able to focus in I need to know my family are good.

Two days before, I start drinking more water, stretching, mobility and light cardio to keep my muscles relaxed.  Dinner the night before is usually lots of vegetables and lean meat.  Sometimes I buy pizza for the morning of a marathon race, as it’s what I crave the most.

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World Sprints Australia 2016

During sprint racing I just snack on crackers, hummus, kumara, banana, nothing too heavy till after the last race.

Marathons, during racing I have banana pancakes and kumara. On the last leg of a marathon race and on the last sprint final I like cold coffee and dark chocolate for the caffeine and sugar rush.  Not too much a fan of energy drinks and powerades. Prefer the raro with a couple of pinches of salt, does the same thing. Wake up at 5am and eat the usual breakfast, keep it simple, do what your body is used to. As a team or individual paddler it is important to stretch and warm your body to prepare it to preform at its best. For me its usually a jog with mobility stretches. Then when we load on the waka go for a warm up paddle and practice some of the strokes that are required in the marathon or sprint.

MANTRA – don’t think too much, just focus on doing the job

BIGGEST MISTAKE – trying to do too much the night before.

Biggest mistake on a race day, is not speaking your gut feeling when something doesn’t feel right, trust your intuition.

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Champions – World Sprints Campaign Australia 2016 

GRATITUDE

A great big mini to Vesna for taking the time to share a little bit of her knowledge with us all.  She is a super talented, busy athlete and mama and approaches everything she does with so much focus.  I love watching her perform on the water.  Vesna left out the part where she has represented NZ on the international paddle scene for many years in both W6 and V1 racing.  she is also a World Champion V1 paddler.  She has been a paddler I have looked to for inspiration for many years and will continue to do so.

Please show your gratitude by leaving a comment for Vesna and sharing her piece forward with your club and friends.

If anything resonates with you head over to the Facebook page and drop a comment.  It may just create some awesome discussion for us all to learn more from.

Much aroha to you for following my journey and mahi.  If you haven’t already please like my Facebook pages and even my instagram page if you are on there.  Don’t be shy, share the love.

Hiria x

#imagine #believe #achieve

Follow me

Hiria Rolleston Mindset Trainer – to help take you to the next level in your paddling, and life

Eastcoast Paddler Aotearoa – for all your paddle gear, canoes and instructional vids

Hiria Rolleston on insta – to follow where my paddle takes me

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Long Distance Nationals – Did it live up to the hype you built for yourself?

COMMITMENT

Training for a long term goal can be hard, I know.  Makes you wonder how our Olympians do it right?

How do you stay focussed for so long?

How do you maintain that physical, mental, emotional and nutritional discipline to reach that end point?

Well, it all comes down to how you prioritise your goal. Is it just the end goal, that outcome of making podium, or top 10, or is it about your personal growth?

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A PERSONAL JOURNEY VS OUTCOME

Some may say that the personal growth and journey stuff is teetz, and too airy fairy but the truth is this is what helps you bounce back when you don’t meet those outcomes the first time around so that you can meet them the next time you try.  It builds resilience and that is something missing in todays society, especially with our younger paddlers.

Too often paddlers will give up thinking they have failed.  They put so much hardwork in and didn’t get the outcome they were hoping for so give up.

I can relate to this because its how I spent my first years in sport, not just paddling (although I did think I was the shiz in paddling ha ha, such a newbie).

An outcome goal is not enough to keep you motivated to get out of bed so early in the morning, or commit to such a huge lifestyle change, because thats what it requires.

When you have thoughts of “oh its sweet, after I finish this I can go back to eating like I did, or not training so much”, these kind of thoughts are what will trip you up in your race because when it gets tough out there its this that creates the negative self talk, the lack of belief in yourself.

TOOLS

Keeping a training journal has helped give me the awareness I needed to deal with these thoughts quickly and easily, giving me the tools to be able to kick it during a race (most of the time).

I say most of the time because the thing is, once we are successful with a challenge, another presents itself.   Its how we grow as human beings.

I used to think, “oh sweet once I get over this hurdle I’ll be sweet,” but yeah nah, they keep coming at you in different ways.  But thats life huh, how boring would it be without a few challenges.  The downs make you appreciate the ups so much more.

FLEXIBILITY

Having a routine is needed, because you do need to be able to measure your improvement somehow.  But be flexible with it.  Just because your programme says each day of the week you have to do this, it doesn’t mean you can’t change it a little.  The weather maybe bad, or you might get sick. Beating yourself up over the programme will only give you more brain damage.

Also, try not to let yourself fall into default with your programme, you know, like groundhog day – where you wake up each day and its the same thing over and over and you end up doing it without thinking.  This is not a good space to be in.

BE INTENTIONAL

Make sure you connect in each day, with why you are doing this in the first place, and be deliberate with your actions, taking conscious action because thats where the gold is.  Its those actions that reset your brain to what works for you and not just being an imitation of someone else.  It sets the pattern for you to be able to react the best way possible for you when you hit challenges out on the water.

There’s nothing worse then coming off the water or in from a training session where you feel like you were just going through the motions.  It feels like a waste of time right? Start backing yourself and honour your time and effort by being intentional.

 

WHAT DID YOU LEARN?

Its never failure when you take away the lessons from it, and there are always lessons. If you don’t see that then you need to start digging a bit deeper, into why you even do what you are doing.

MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE

Firstly, I’m pretty damn stoked with myself for what I managed to achieve and the opportunities I had to paddle with some pretty cool paddlers.  But I am going to admit that I did have a moment where I was upset with myself for not trying harder, giving it my best and letting my own self talk get to me.  In all honesty I still have that nasty dialogue go through my mind when it matters most, but, and this is a big one – I no longer let bring me down. Its important to ‘feel’ those feelings, because if you deny it starts a spiral of downward actions and you will end up at the bottom.

I could have sat and wallowed in my pity but I chose to accept it for what it was, I thought I had a shit race, felt bad for a teeny bit then decided, “this ain’t helping me at all” so I let myself move on.  Too often, especially us females, we can hold on to feelings, and let them rule our present and future. This is not healthy for our paddling at all and it starts to subconsciously show up and then we react to it, usually in the wrong way.  This can present itself by not taking up opportunities, or in the waka focussing on someones else role instead of ours, or by nit picking at somebody because they rub you up the wrong way, when in actual fact you are probably seeing your own reflection of what you need to work on yourself.

This is why mindset is so important in your paddling and sport. It’s the stuff that can either make you or break you and is the key to being your best self.

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Open womens 16km Long distance nationals 2017, Dale Thomas Bronze, Hiria Rolleston Silver, Marianna Hodges Gold.

TIPS

When I started writing this blog I thought about doing it as a personal wrap up from my own LDNs, which in a sense it is.  There are definitely elements in this that I need to pay attention to.  Its where my inspiration comes from, lived experience.  But, from conversations I had while there and the themes coming from it this approach felt better to me.

My daily routine consists of the physical aspects of training and connecting in to my surroundings, atua (gods, guardians) which fills me spiritually too, as well as my mental/emotional well-being by checking in with myself to make sure I am being intentional with what I do and making sure my thoughts and feelings are my own and not me getting caught up in someones else stuff.  I do this by journalling, I have a training journal and a business journal which helps me to work through and process my actions.  I also meditate by grabbing a moment to sit still and ask “where am I right now?”  It always brings me right back into the present and gives me clarity.

So, coming back to the title of this, I’m hoping you are still with me here ha ha, yes Long distance Nationals did live up to the hype for me, but I have a whole new bunch of things to work on now, which I’m grateful for because I know its going to help me grow evermore and is another deliberate step toward my dreams and goals.

I am grateful to everyone who came up to me and congratulated me on my medals, thats very humbling.  But even more so thankful to those people who came up to me to share their thoughts and feelings on this mahi (work) I have been doing around mindset. I have always been pretty open about what I do and share from my own experience.  I do have a Sports Science and Sport Psych background too as was a PE teacher once upon a time, so I do have the academic knowledge to back me up (it’s not all made up lol).

I share because my own journey was so difficult that I want to be able to help others.  We have so much talent out there in our communities going unseen because of our current culture around paddling from grassroots to elite.  Not blaming anyone particular person or group, but reminding us all that if we can be more open and not afraid of sharing that you will actually see it helps lift us all.

Would love to know if anything in here as given you a lightbulb moment.  Please share the aroha, share with anyone you think will benefit from this, and then drop me a comment on here or head over to my Facebook page and drop me a comment.

Sharing is caring

Hiria x

#imagine #believe #achieve

Follow me

Hiria Rolleston Mindset Trainer – to help take you to the next level in your paddling, and life

Eastcoast Paddler Aotearoa – for all your paddle gear, canoes and instructional vids

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INSPIRED SERIES – Nyree King

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Nyree after winning the SMW V1 500m at 2016 World Sprints in Australia and setting a new World Record time of 2.35.96

NYREE KING

Senior Master Women

Paddling 14 years.  Started in 2003 – when I was in my 40s

2004 won the Silver medal in the Master Women V1 500m in Hilo Hawaii.  This was my first international event.

Been the Senior Master Women NZ National Champ six times.

World sprint Champion in 2006 in Aotearoa and again in 2016 in Australia.

Currently world record holder in the SMW V1 500m.

EVENTS

Although I have done quite well in sprints, my passion is long distance – and have crossed the Kaiwi channel from Molokai to Oahu in Na Wahine o Ke Kai (the women’s Molokai race) a total of four times now – once in the OC1 relay – and three times in crews winning Masters 40s in 2009 and 2016.

Have done the Pailolo twice and would rate this race as THE best downwind fun.  Would love to do Pailolo in an OC1!

I try to do as many national and international W6 and W1 events as money and leave will allow.  I have amazing friends whom I love to paddle with.  At home I love to do the Bo Herbert and Bhutty races and this year was able to do the Poor Knights Crossing as well.  There are lots of races I love to do here at home – Whaingaroa, Takapuna Cup, LDNs, Kaiteriteri etc.

This year – paddling took me to portland Oregon for two races in ‘The gorge’ (the Columbia river) with over 500 SUP, OC1 and Ski on the start line.  It was epic!

BUCKET LIST (not yet done) Liberty Challenge, Womens V3 race in Tahiti, Hawaikinui womens race, Kauai challenge Relay, Dad’s Centre (we never got to finish that race), Gold Coast Cup, Maui Nui (to do again and again) – Pailolo and Na Wahine.

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2016 winners of Na Wahine o Ke Kai 40s wiht Denise Darval-Chang, Katie Stephens, Mykala Bradley, Margie Kawaiaea and Tee Felgate from Hawaii, Jill Schooler and Jeane Barrett from California.  Ngaire Pehi and myself from NZ.

MANTRA 

I suppose my mantra would be  “be in the moment – each stroke’.  When I first started paddling it used to be “Go hard, then go harder!)  but these days that mantra has more to do with my mental toughness than paddling strategy!

ROUTINE

I have quite a specific mental checklist for V1 sprints to ensure that I am totally prepared as there is not a lot of wriggle room for stuff ups – but mostly I try to stay relaxed.  I use visualisation, bungees for warm up and hydrate well in the lead up to events.  I also make sure that our family eat well and have a good meal the night before.  Usually porridge, berries, yoghurt and coffee the morning of race day – but I also take a bar to nibble if race start is delayed… there is nothing worse than feeling hungry before you get on the water.

I like to have everything ready for race day but sometimes things can get messy when the whole family is trying to use the same resources (i.e.. canoes and water systems).  Sometimes you just have to be adaptable and go with what you got!

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With Tupuria and Rose King at the 2016 World sprints Nyree after winning SMW V1 500m.  Tipu Bronze Open Men, Rose Bronze Open Women V1 finals.

BIGGEST MISTAKE

I’ve had a few but here are two.

I rigged my kit in the wrong way around and had to jump into a bumpy ocean to turn it the right way with my paddling buddy’s (Ngaire and Brennan) unable to assist because of the conditions.  Lucky I did rectify it as the ocean was huge and we had to follow the line of the Tutukaka dive boat to get back into the safety of Tutukaka harbour.  I don’t think we knew how big it was going to be!

Another mistake – not paddle fit for Bhutty’s one year – even wore two pairs of neoprenes so my butt wouldn’t get sore – fell out twice and cracked my canoe.  The thing was – I really wanted to do the race but was underprepared mentally and physically.  Lesson learned.

GRATITUDE

Nyree is one of those paddlers who I have held in awe since I began paddling. She is so strong, focussed and just smashes it out there on the race course.  One year I had to fill in for her team as a steerer at a training and was so starstruck!

I am especially pleased to share Nyree’s korero because I have always and will always look up to her.   She is just as beautiful off the water as she is on the water.  It’s pretty clear to see where Rose and Tupuria get their strength from.  Though the whole family paddles and they all do pretty damn good, including husband Dave King and sisters Riana and Hannah.

Our paddlers have given this information freely so please show some awhi (love, support) and go like their athlete pages if they have one or drop a comment on the blog thread on my Facebook post.

If anything resonates with you head over to the Facebook page and drop a comment.  It may just create some awesome discussion for us all to learn more from.

Much aroha to you for following my journey and mahi.  If you haven’t already please like my Facebook pages and even my instagram page if you are on there.  Don’t be shy, share the love.

Hiria x

#imagine #believe #achieve

Follow me

Hiria Rolleston Mindset Trainer – to help take you to the next level in your paddling, and life

Eastcoast Paddler Aotearoa – for all your paddle gear, canoes and instructional vids

Hiria Rolleston on insta – to follow where my paddle takes me

 

INSPIRED SERIES – Michael Rogerson

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Mike Long distance Nationals 2016 – Gold Medallist 

MICHAEL ROGERSON

Division: Master Men

Club: Turangawaewae

Lives in Hamilton.

Paddling for 10 years.

I paddle all year round and participate in all the main races around the country.

ROUTINE

My routine for races starts about a few days out.  I start to organise my paddling equipment and waka making sure it’s all in good working order (i.e. drink systems, rudder and rudder cables) and to make sure I haven’t misplaced anything.  Nothing worse than running around the morning of a race in a panic doing repairs or trying to find something.

I also try and concentrate on eating well and hydrating leading up to a race.  I have come unstuck during races by not doing these two things in the lead up.

The night before I like to have a big meal with plenty of vegetables some pasta and either Chicken, fish or steak.  For breakfast its porridge with cream, brown sugar and a banana with a cup of tea.  Then it will be a 50/50 mix of electrolytes and water and just snack on scroggin leading up to the race.

The morning of the race I try and stay relaxed not rush around too much.  I’ll stretch throughout the morning.  I’ll usually try and get out on the water at least 15 minutes before race to loosen and warm up.

MANTRA

My mantra is be confident but humble.  You must have the confidence to back yourself if you want to succeed but also be humble in victory or defeat.

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Takapuna Beach Cup 2017 – 24km Relay

BIGGEST MISTAKE

The biggest mistake I ever made leading up to a race was not washing out my hydro pack before racing one year at the Bo Herbert Memorial race.  I became very sick halfway during the race and lost a lot of places.  So hence why I like to make sure I have everything organised days in advance.  Cheers Mike.

GRATITUDE

Mike Rogerson lives his mantra to a tee! He is one of the most humble paddlers I know.  I got to know Mike a bit better on our worlds Campaign for Tahiti Long distance champs this year.  When I approached him to write this little piece he was very taken aback by it not realising how much he has to offer us all.

Its similar with all our paddlers. Most ask “why me, I’m not special”. Actually you are, because it’s the way you do what you do that counts. It’s interesting to see and acknowledge our differences because those differences will really resonate with someone else and give them hope.

I admire Mikes consistency to his training while supporting his whanau, and coaching at his club.  Trying to compete yourself as an athlete and coach is no easy task so I take my hat of to him for that.

Our paddlers have given this information freely so please show some awhi (love, support) and go like their athlete pages if they have one or drop a comment on the blog thread on my Facebook post.

If anything resonates with you head over to the Facebook page and drop a comment.  It may just create some awesome discussion for us all to learn more from.

Much aroha to you for following my journey and mahi.  If you haven’t already please like my Facebook pages and even my instagram page if you are on there.  Don’t be shy, share the love.

Hiria x

#imagine #believe #achieve

Follow me

Hiria Rolleston Mindset Trainer – to help take you to the next level in your paddling, and life

Eastcoast Paddler Aotearoa – for all your paddle gear, canoes and instructional vids

Hiria Rolleston on insta – to follow where my paddle takes me

INSPIRED SERIES – Anne Cairns

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Anne paddling for her club team Manuz and Jemimaz

ANNE CAIRNS

This hearty paddler is from Palmerston North, and is an open womens paddler for Manuz and Jemiman from Haeata Ocean Sports.  She has been racing waka since 2010.

Main sport focus is sprint flatware kayaking but have competed nationally and internationally in a number of paddle sports; surf lifesaving, wildwater kayaking, ocean ski racing, waka ama and whitewater rafting.

I asked her if she has any specific events she does each year and her reply was;

Ha ha I don’t really have a typical amount of events per year, it’s really dependent on what my focus is that year or what is happening long term (i.e olympic cycle campaigns where I cut right back on waka or other disciplines in the two years proceeding doing a few waka races and maybe five or so sprint regattas which are Europe based so take time and funding to commit to.  Or post olympics like this year across my varying disciplines of waterspouts where I’ve done half a dozen waka races, surf lifesaving nationals, a couple of rafting events, and ocean ski worlds plus i like to do as many local races as possible in waka, flatwater, and multisport racing too.

ROUTINE

Depends on what type of race I’m doing (which paddlesport and sprint or long distance). For waka though I make sure all my kit and equipment is ready, usually the night before if possible.  Making sure to be hydrated well in the 2-3 days before but thats kinda just standard all the time.

Dinner night before based on what I’m feeling like, often chicken veggies (kumara or taro if I can get some) and maybe some pasta/rice.  And the routine green tea and chocolate before bed.

In the morning I eat a solid kai 2-2.5 hours before, porridge with berries and seeds and keep sipping on electrolyte, listen to music and stay relaxed but feeling ready… strong black coffee about 30 minutes before (especially for sprint racing).

For kayak racing I’ll do a pre warm up about 60-90 minutes before race time with a 20 minute set warm up before the race…  waka is a bit more relaxed, bit of dynamic land warm up and a paddle warm up with some builds/changing intensity… often have a snack of banana and honey on white bread about 1 hour before the race.

MANTRA

 

I don’t really have a mantra, I more try to just focus on the process of what I need to do, the outcome I want, technique, timing, race plan.

Biggest thing I remind myself is to enjoy it, no matter if it’s an olympic start line or a local race I do all the training and everything because I enjoy it and I can.  Not everyone gets to do what they enjoy and have a passion for so I’m unashamedly opportunity greedy and make no apologies for it.

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Anne representing Samoa at the Olympics

BIGGEST MISTAKE

Ha ha biggest mistake is slippery hands!!!  Apply sunscreen early or ideally get someone else to do it for you!  I always roughen up my hands with sand or mud, it’s a crap situation when you’re hands are slipping on the shaft, you grip tighter and it plays on your mind.

GRATITUDE

Again, I have only really got to know Anne through our recent World’s Campaign but knowing she is an olympic paddler and seeing how she trains and her consistency with her focus and nutrition was pretty cool.

I admired her approach to the team and flexibility coming from a predominantly individual paddle background.  She is one hundy chic and someone I totally admire on and off the water.

Our paddlers have given this information freely so please show some awhi (love, support) and go like their athlete pages if they have one or drop a comment on the blog thread on my Facebook post.

If anything resonates with you head over to the Facebook page and drop a comment.  It may just create some awesome discussion for us all to learn more from.

Much aroha to you for following my journey and mahi.  If you haven’t already please like my Facebook pages and even my instagram page if you are on there.  Don’t be shy, share the love.

Hiria x

#imagine #believe #achieve

Follow me

Hiria Rolleston Mindset Trainer – to help take you to the next level in your paddling, and life

Eastcoast Paddler Aotearoa – for all your paddle gear, canoes and instructional vids

Hiria Rolleston on insta – to follow where my paddle takes me

Inspired Series – Marama Elkington

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Interview with Va’a News after Marama’s Gold Medal achievement at World Long Distance Champs Tahiti.

MARAMA ELKINGTON

My name is Marama Elkington.  I’m a paddler from Porirua and I paddle for Hawaikinui Tuarua Waka Ama Club.  I paddle in the Open womens division, and have been paddling for 13 years.

I usually compete in the National Sprints, and some long distance races like the NZ Aito, and Tahiti Aito.

ROUTINE

Before I attend an event I educate myself to my competition.  I watch potential threats in a W6 and strategies.  When I get to the competition I familiarise myself with my course and conditions.

The night before I stretch and have my strategy planned, but adjust it the next day depending on different aspects.

On race day I sleep as much as I can, but also head down to observe the race calls, race starts and things like that.

Before a race I warm up by running, skipping, and exercises.  I also stretch and slap down my body, and keep my body moving to keep the nerves from settling.

However I always have to do a nervous pee before every race (some habits die hard aye).

I don’t have a special diet, I usually snack after a race, and eat when I have enough time between races.

MANTRA

My saying is “Go hundy or go home”.

When I race I leave everything on the water.  I like to remember the feelings I had when I lost to previous opponents and channel that when I both train.

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Gold Medal victory in the Junior Long distance race at World Champs Tahiti 2017.

BIGGEST MISTAKE

I have no regrets leading up to race day, as I feel that is half of the work that goes into a race, being prepared.  During my Open Women’s final in Australia, at the World sprints I however learnt a crucial lesson in racing.  I have always had a bad habit of looking to the side at my opponent while racing.  I looked across with 5ms to go, I fumbled with my paddle, and I lost.

This is probably the biggest thing I regret because I think I would have won.  This however taught me the importance of trusting yourself and truly believing in what you can do, and your training.

GRATITUDE

I have had the privilege to know Marama and train with her in the past and all I can say is wow.  Her presence can be quite intimidating because she is so focussed on the mahi. I have always been inspired by her work ethic and commitment to training and paddling, which clearly pays off.

So much gratitude to Marama for having the courage to step up and share her knowledge and how she makes it work for her.

Our paddlers have given this information freely so please show some awhi (love, support) and go like their athlete pages if they have one or drop a comment on the blog thread on my Facebook post.

If anything resonates with you head over to the Facebook page and drop a comment.  It may just create some awesome discussion for us all to learn more from.

Much aroha to you for following my journey and mahi.  If you haven’t already please like my Facebook pages and even my instagram page if you are on there.  Don’t be shy, share the love.

 

Hiria x

#imagine #believe #achieve

Follow me

Hiria Rolleston Mindset Trainer – to help take you to the next level in your paddling, and life

Eastcoast Paddler Aotearoa – for all your paddle gear, canoes and instructional vids

Hiria Rolleston on insta – to follow where my paddle takes me

Five simple hacks to transform your training

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You’ve tried it all huh? The crazy training regimes, the diets, the latest fad and still not getting the results you are after?
There is so much information out there on how to paddle, how to train, what to eat, how much sleep to have its all a bit overwhelming.
Time is important to us all and we don’t want to get it wrong.   So who do we believe?
This is what I learned through my own experience.
1.  Have an open mind.  Listen to those willing to share knowledge. It doesn’t mean you have to do it. Once you have gathered it all up then decide how to make it fit you.  Not the other way around.
2. Put you first.  If you are really wanting success you need to start putting yourself first. Feed yourself, train yourself, educate yourself first because then it gives you the chance to improve and help others. You can’t lead someone somewhere if you haven’t been there yourself.
3. Learn the basics and do them well.  Leave all the tricky shit. Learn the absolute fundamentals based on how your body is supposed to move.
4. Get to know yourself.  This is the only way you will get it working for you.  Dig a bit deeper below what you say you like or think into what you truly feel, not what you do because someone else does it.
5. WHATS YOUR WHY?  This is probably the most important part.  I left it for last because I’m guessing you would have stopped reading if I put it first.  Most people do physical activity or sports as a means of losing weight or making friends, or to bulk up etc.  When it comes to those hard days where you don’t want to get out of bed or drag yourself to the gym after work, these things don’t motivate you enough.  But, if you were to focus more on the kind of character you would be building and look at being the best version of yourself it opens you up to so much more potential you probably didn’t realise you had.  My goal is to be the best damn paddler I CAN BE, and that doesn’t mean I don’t want to win. I have learned that if I want to be my best that I need to do the hard work on my physical training, my eating, my sleep, my emotional wellbeing, taking care of my whole rather than one area alone.  It gives me more chances of success.  Don’t get me wrong, if that old way works for you that’s awesome, but please do try looking at it in a holistic way.  I used to train my butt off for image and weight because thats what I thought I had to do and in the process it made me a bit crazy, and uptight.  I would always feel deprived, whereas this way I feel like I have won the lottery!  My mind is at peace, and I’m making the physical gains too.
If you really want to transform your performance and are over where you are at now try something different.  Don’t give up until you can say you have really tried.
Remember if something in here has given you an ‘aha’ moment jump onto my facebook page and leave a comment.  Your contribution may just help someone else.  Thanks for all the aroha and following me on my journey.
Hiria x
#beyourbest

Confession time – Showing up as my true self isn’t always easy

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Having courage to stand out.

That feeling you get when you are so excited about something, but nervous at the same time of how people will react.

That was me about a week ago.

I was at a writers workshop (to get me in my zone for my book, thesis), when the writing prompts we were given brought gave me an epiphany ( I seem to have these a lot this year).

It suddenly dawned on me that everything I have studied over the years, taught in school, uni and through the wananga as well as my time as a public health advocate, were all pointing to one thing – sports psychology.

When I was living in Australia back in my teens I wanted to come back to NZ and study psychology, its always interested me.  But my pull to do sports was stronger and I ended up doing a Bachelor of Sport and Recreation first.  It was in my undergrad years that I got a taste of sports psych and learned a lot of simple tools around how to excel in sports and why some athletes don’t.  And I got to cover this again in my post grad papers and coaching.  However I left it at that and went on to explore other areas.

There are lessons in everything we do.

I’ve played representative sport most of my life to a high level but I always used to ‘choke’ when it really mattered.   Choking is when an athlete focuses too much on the future outcome and the negative thoughts create that emotional reaction resulting in them choking.

I soon began to realise that I did this off the field too, in life, when I had big things going, important things.

Getting back to how showing up as me isn’t always easy, well, it takes guts to step out on your own and speak your own truth, anyone knows that.  So when I had this thought about what I should be focussing on, combining my strengths as a paddler with my education it made sense, but I had that little voice in my head saying “who are you to think that” and “what makes you so special”, my ego was really doing a doozy on me.

Love and kindness

I’m lucky I am now surrounded by some very seriously strong ambitious women who see how lifting others up helps lift us all and they reminded me to kick the mind chatter and that I got this.

So I decided to hone in my skills and focus on working with paddlers.  I made a name change from Mindset Trainer for women to Paddlers!

One simple word has the power to change so much.  It really is true.  Since doing this I have had lots of activity happening, posts, likes, comments and paddlers reaching out asking for me to work with them on mindset as they have seen with their own eyes my own transformation and progression in my paddling.

What I truly know for sure is we teach through experience, and if you have the knowledge to go with that then thats a bonus isn’t it.

I’m only just beginning.

All this work I’ve done on my self development, and I still have trouble stepping up into my truth.  But thats life right, forever learning, new challenges, new growth.  It’s the evolutionary journey of transformation.

Now that I have come full circle I can see where all my past experiences fit and I am totally making it work for me.  No regrets, just gratitude for the learning I have had. When I have those days where I feel unsure about showing up in my totality I remind myself of why I am doing this, and that is because I have a story to tell and feel deep in my heart that there is someone else out there on a similar journey that needs to hear it so that they too can step up and then pay it forward to others.  In the hope that we all end up living this life as our best selves in what ever it is we choose.

Thank you as always for taking the time to read.  If you want to follow me checkout my Facebook page  or check me out on instagram 

 

Hiria x

#imagine #believe #achieve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My top 6 High performance mindset hacks for everyday life

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What if you approached each day with intent and purpose just as elites do, rather than waking up into ground hog day.  And brought out your inner champion in your life or business?

If your first thoughts are,

because its hard work,

I don’t have time

Well, then sorry dear you are in the wrong place so should probably stop reading.

 

Still here?

Then sweet, you are on the right track to making your dreams come true.

Elite athletes have drive, determination, focus and ambition, much the same as anyone who is passionate about what they do.  It makes sense to apply the same logic to your life or business as they do to their sport.  I mean, why wouldn’t you right?

Here’s my tips on having a high performance mindset. Give them a bash and see what is possible for you.

  • be you first.  When you are strong in who you are and your identity opportunities open up to you.  This is where confidence comes from.
  • have a plan or goal. This gives focus and will be your anchor when you hit those tough days.
  • visualise it, athletes use mental imagery a lot to create realness around your goal.  visualise the process, not just the end goal. Visualise how you feel, what the environment is like so that you are prepared mentally and your session plays out as you wish.
  • Take action, daily.  Its the daily act of showing up that matters. it doesn’t always have to be physically, but you do have to pay some attention to your goal daily even if its resting or planning, something that keeps in the front of your mind.
  • Have balance, so learn when rest is needed.  Without sleep our body cannot grow and neither can our mind.  Its just as important as good nutrition and hydration so make sure you do this.
  • seek help or guidance when needed from a coach.  How many top athletes do you know got their on their own? Seriously?  You will always find someone has been at their side at some stage.  A coach is able to offer unbiased, real time feedback and give you that accountability boot when it gets hard and you start to slack off.
  • Attitude. The kind of attitude you approach your goals with will determine the outcome. So if you want good things to happen you need to think good things. Learn how to rewire your brain and mindset to produce positive verbal and body language and thats what you will receive.

If you liked this please share the love with someone else. And thank you for reading.

 

Go get em champion!

Hiria x

 

#imagine #believe #achieve

Three hacks to finding more time to do the things that light you up!

Hey babe,

You are either reading this because you value your time and will do anything to try and find more of it.  Or you are at a loss as to how other people are able to fit so much into their day.

Lets start with time itself. What are your first thoughts or feelings when you hear that word?

I usually get my back up and then my eyes glaze over.

You know why?

Because it seems to be all people talk about today, like it is the single most important commodity that drives humans.

I felt like I didn’t have a hope in hell of finding more time to do what I needed to and wanted to so shut off completely.

Until I stumbled across this great book I was given years ago but just never had the time to read. Well, I sat down and read it one day, from cover to cover.  It set me off on my journey to making things work better for me, by finding other people who seemed like they knew what they were doing and trying it for myself.

This is what has worked for me.

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1.  Get a goal, a clear focus or dream.  Something to use as an anchor everyday.

By having a goal it helps you to have focus and prioritise what you need to do and love to do as opposed to all the shady little great areas in between where we worry about this and that.  It is in this space that we actually waste a lot of our precious time.

2.  Shred the task list and instead work to intentions.  This one totally blew my mind. My business coach gave me this wee tool and it is the single most life changing thing that has helped me across the board. I used to get overwhelmed by task lists and had everything on there that I needed to complete, well so I thought.  The thing is, those tasks were still taking up precious head space even after writing them down. They were staring at me daily and if I didn’t get to ticking them off that day I would feel like crap and useless.  Now I focus on only 3 intentions a day, (not including housework because that is a given and autopilot to some degree, they don’t take up head space).  I list my top 3 activities that I know will get me the most gains in my day toward my goal and anything else I get done after that is a bonus.  It really stops me from fluffing about.

3.  Take action, everyday and use the 5 sec rule.  So yes we all know that taking action is pretty logical right, but what about when you just don’t want to? Thats where the 5 sec rule comes in. I had been doing this all my sporting life but didn’t realise it until I came across Mel Robins Tedtalk on the 5 sec rule.  Basically she says  you have 5 secs to make a decision because after that all of your excuses get the better of you. So nip it in the mud before it even gets a chance. My way to combat this is to remove as many of the excuses as possible, like preparation, of meals or gear I need to get going, or making sure I have all the right information. Its too easy to make an excuse if we have one little piece of the puzzle not at our finger tips right.

All these little hacks have helped me to be way more productive leaving me more energised and just happy which makes me a better person to be around for my kids and family.

Hope they help you too.

As a Mindset trainer I love helping others shift through any mental or emotional blocks that are holding you back from achieving your success, whether it be anxiety, fear, anger and in all areas of life and business.  If you feel you are ready to make some changes and needed a bit of a helping hand flick me an email and lets chat to see if we are the right fit for each other.

Remember, There is nothing bigger than myself!

Hiria x

#imagine #believe #achieve

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